• Journal
  • DONATIONS
  • Instagram/ FB
  • Perspective
  • Contact
  • Shop

“We can move water easily with plastic pipes. We can move shade around with nursery cloth like a tinker toy for animals and plants. Yet we have developed this necessity to grow food with chemical fertiliser because we have forgotten the magic of manure.”

Joel Salatin

WEEK 19 | México a Caballo

Pachuca, Hidalgo to Huichapan, Hidalgo | 5 days riding, 135kms.

 

DAY 137 | Remote Hidalgo, Mexico.

Posted by 5000 Miles of Hope on Wednesday, September 18, 2019

 

 

We set off from the awesome Rancho El Rosal, just outside of Pachuca de Soto, to head towards Queretaro. We took a different route than last year, mainly to get away from the busy Hidalgo roads while also trying a flatter route.

Saying goodbye to Salvador Mancera.

The first day, after ridng thru lots of rocky trails, ended up in the beginning of the Shit Valley, a fertile green valley fed by city sewage water. I followed canals and empty train tracks for the next 3 days. Everything was super green, and, yes a little smelly. My personal take is that, YES, this waste water should be used to fertilize fields, but, NO, it should be treated/ composted first. What do you think?

Pretty trail.

Shit canals.

Shit fields.

More sewage water.

Alfalfa!

With my hosts the alfalfa farmers.

Green from shit.

Lots of trail riding this week.

Tlaxcoapan.

I made my way near Tula, but the area wasn’t very friendly or safe in my mind. I was happy to carry in further.

Restaurant in Tlaxcoapan.

Lion of freedom.

After crossing the tip of the Presa Edho, I made my way up and above the Shit Fields, to take a day off at an Envangelical Center. Roxy rested up and ate a lot of grass. I visited a huge tree. Then we went further up and I started feeling like I had a cold. Probably because I had slept in some areas with a draft at night, but it could have also been having to listen to fanatics for 2 days trying to help me save my soul.

A big tree.

A really big tree!

With my host the Evangelical Ascencion.

Lil bit of rain.

Rock fences.

Big sky country.

Cattle guards.

High mountain flowers.

By the time I made it to Huichapan, I was getting weaker. I made it into that town on September 14, Día de Charro. I stayed at the Lienzo Charro and slept alot. There were lots of horses parked around after a huge group ride/ cabalgata. If I had felt better I would have taken more photos. Long riding can be hard on your health, and this week it was.

Lienzo Charro Huichapan.

The week way beautiful, even though smelly. The views this whole week, and around Huichapan were quite nice.